Governments Must Never Perform Services That Free Markets Can Do

It was never my intention to be a land developer. I thought people could buy farmland and move onto it. Utah County has so many utility requirements that I had to develop and sell off lots to pay for them. For example, I could have used geothermal, solar and/or wind energy instead of having more than a half mile of trench dug and cable installed for Rocky Mountain Power.

Most people can only imagine there’s a lot of hoops to jump through.

The difficulty is fighting tyrannical governments and their hundreds of pages of stale, corrupted, inflexible laws, and dealing with their employee’s unrighteous dominion and animosity towards We the People.

If you’ve ever had to buy a service from the government or get their permission to do something, you know that they are usually awful to deal with. No service that private markets can render should be monopolized by governments.

I’ve attended dozens of county and planning meetings and have never heard the word liberty used outside of the Pledge of Allegiance. Some employees feel it is the proper role of government to provide for the safety, welfare and health of the people; they forget that Founding Fathers knew the property role of government was to protect liberty–your right to do whatever you please without government intervention as long as you don’t hurt your neighbors. There is a huge difference.

— Robert John Stevens, February 6, 2018

Can Community Standards Replace Government Regulations?

by Robert John Stevens, June 23, 2016

Community-established regulations may work better than government-establishment regulations because government-established regulations are usually created by government employees who don’t personally experience the need, pain or side effects.

In software we enjoy free-market, community-driven software standards. For example, web browsers work because of community standards in HTML, CSS and Javascript. These standards were not created by governments but by people. And they are continually evolving as good ideas are implemented and bad ideas are deprecated.

Years ago when Microsoft tried to create their own standards for Internet Explorer (IE) they created problems for millions or programmers. Today most programmers wish IE would just disappear. Fortunately it continues to lose market share.

The United States was established as independent states where each can innovate without interference and the best ideas are independently tested and adopted by other states.

It would be a very interesting test to see if community standards can replace government regulations. If one town, city, county or state successfully embarked on it, even with a small subset of their regulations, it would be a role model and case study for the rest of the nation.

Government would again be returned to the people, its rightful owners. The size of government would diminish. Innovation would flourish. The act of replacing government regulations with community standards may go viral.