Threatening vs Praying For the President

by Robert John Stevens, November 2, 2017

All Americans, regardless of their politics or opinions, should be very uncomfortable when people threaten the life of the President of the United States or use their celebrity position to say or do something similar.

While threats may give perpetrators a moment of media fame, they plant ideas into the heads of those who are mentally unstable. For example, we know that if a teenager commits suicide, more teenagers will entertain the idea.

Because of the First Amendment, the government cannot tell people what not to think or say, so what can be done?

If the mainstream and alternative medias practiced restraint and did not showcase the misdeeds of such people, then fewer ideas would be propagated.

If the media ignored such events then whether acts are committed by individuals acting alone, funded by criminal organizations or orchestrated by the deep state, influence would be greatly diminished.

At the very least Americans should know that the government takes all threats with the greatest concern and those who threaten will be questioned and investigated.

In contrast, Mormons pray for the President in temples many times a day. I’d like to see the Executive Branch highlight Americans who pray for the President, and urge the media to practice restraint as President Kennedy did1 so good is propagated and the President is persuaded to introduce peace on earth.


1 Listen to John F. Kennedy’s famous speech below:

RE: Donald Trump: An Evaluation — Paul Craig Roberts

Hi Paul,

In your article, Donald Trump: An Evaluation — Paul Craig Roberts you’re right and insightful to point out that Trump’s advisors will surely influence his stance and decisions. Now that you wrote it, hopefully he’ll correct his path.

We live though in a country where few people strive to understand correct precepts and principles. As you well know, attempts to discover them require criss-crossing through landmines of untruths. I believe though that correct precepts and principles are built into us and when we re-connect to them we bask in “ah ha moments.”

Even the word precept has been corrupted. Look at its meaning in 1828, “In a general sense, any commandment or order intended as an authoritative rule of action; but applied particularly to commands respecting moral conduct. The ten commandments are so many precepts for the regulation of our moral conduct.”

http://webstersdictionary1828.com/Dictionary/precept

By the way, the spelling of these two words need to be corrected in your article:

disqulifying (disqualifying)
insubstantialality (insubstantiality)

Merry Christmas!

Robert Stevens
Provo, Utah